Roberta C. Mayer

Roberta C. Mayer

Roberta C. Mayer

Republican candidate for Maine House District 90 from Damariscotta

Running against Michael Gilbert Devin. View your ballot →

Is Maine too generous in providing social services to its residents? Which government benefits should be increased or decreased?

I agree with limitations on purchases with SNAP benefits and strengthening requirements for lost cards--both designed to reduce fraud and increase the availability of benefits to a wider audience. Limitations also should be placed on the length of time residents can receive welfare benefits. Currently, residents are able to collect welfare benefits for almost twice the national average.

Do you support expanding or raising the sales tax to lower the state income tax? Why or why not?

No. Raising sales tax will make it more difficult for many residents to make ends meet, and potentially could hurt businesses (e.g., restaurants) when people change their spending habits due to increased taxes.

Do you support marijuana legalization in Maine, as outlined in Question 1?

No

Please explain your answer. (Not required)

I do not support this for a number of reasons. (1) Maine is already experiencing a drug problem and doesn't need to add to it. (2) Young people's brains don't fully develop until their mid- to late-20's, and being able to legally consume marijuana at 21 would be detrimental to healthy brain development. (3) Like alcohol, marijuana is an impairing substance, and their is a likelihood that there will be an increase in motor vehicle crashes and their resultant injuries and fatalities. Maine's crash/fatality rate has grown in the last several years, and legalizing recreational use of marijuana will only add to the problem.

Do you support raising taxes on Mainers with incomes above $200,000 to increase state aid to education, as outlined in Question 2?

No

Please explain your answer. (Not required)

Maine currently has one of the highest per-pupil spending among the 50 states, yet our test scores remain low. Additional funding is not the answer--better management of available funding is. If this question passes, Maine's highest tax rate will be the highest in the nation, which is not beneficial when attempting to attract business to the state. Additionally, those making more than $200,000 per year are typically the largest philanthropists in the state, providing thousands of dollars to local charities that provide a wide range of services to the community. One has to question whether those donated dollars will decrease as their taxes increase, resulting in a loss of services via local non-profit organizations.

Do you support universal background checks for firearm sales, as outlined in Question 3?

No

Please explain your answer. (Not required)

Candidate did not answer this question.

Should Maine raise its minimum wage, as outlined in Question 4?

No

Please explain your answer. (Not required.)

The major problem with this referendum question is that it eliminates the tipped credit. Currently, waitstaff and bartenders can make anywhere from $15-$50 per hour in tips. The current tipped credit allows restaurant owners to pay tipped workers half of the minimum wage since they make up the difference in tips. If passed, the primary way to adapt to these changes would be to raise prices drastically, greatly reducing the number of potential clientele, particularly for small restaurant owners.

In locations where the minimum wage has been increased, there has been a loss of jobs as businesses change their business model to continue to not lose revenue do to the increased wage.

The Maine Legislature has raised the minimum wage 9 times in the past 20 years and that has seemingly done nothing to help lift people out of poverty.

Do you support the initiative to use ranked-choice voting to elect state and federal officials in Maine, as outlined in Question 5?

No

Please explain your answer. (Not required)

No. While proponents say that Ranked Choice Voting will ensure that the candidate with more than 50 percent of the vote will be selected, that's not the case. Portlands 2011 mayoral election, for example, used ranked-choice voting algorithm to count the votes. With 19,728 voters casting ballots in this election with 15 candidates, the winner Michael Brennan after 14 rounds received 9,061 votes, or 45.9 percent support of all voters who cast ballots. Fifty four percent of the voters did not want the winner. Rank choice voting simply does not do what it purports to do.

Should Maine prioritize law enforcement efforts to intercept drug traffickers over expanding access to substance abuse treatment, such those that incorporates medications like methadone and Suboxone?

Candidate did not answer this question.

Should Maines constitutional officers -- the secretary of state, the attorney general, auditor and the treasurer -- continue to be elected by the Legislature or by statewide popular vote?

I don't believe that Maine's constitutional officers should be elected at all but, as integral parts of the executive branch of government, should be appointed by the governor.

Is the size of Maines Legislature appropriate? Should the pay for legislative service be increased?

Yes. The legislature does not need to be any larger than it is and could, in fact, be reduced. Pay should not be increased for the legislature, and the benefits should be reduced or eliminated. I do not believe that part-time legislators receive pension benefits, payed by taxpayers--many of whom do not have pensions and work well into their 80's to make ends meet.

High pay and generous pension benefits for essentially part-time employees can attract individuals who have their own interests in mind rather than the concerns of the people they are elected to serve.

Would you support sanctioning another elected official if he or she made public comments or statements that were considered racist, offensive or prejudicial?

Candidate did not answer this question.

Would you support a so-called right to work law in Maine?

Yes.

Would you support legislation or a ballot question to allow more casinos in Maine?

No. I do not believe that you can build a healthy state economy based on casinos. The benefit of more jobs may be offset by increasing more of society's ills--gambling addiction; money being spent on gambling vs. meeting family needs; increase in alcohol use and and associated problems, etc.

What is the biggest barrier to economic development in Maine and what can the Legislature do to address it?

Candidate did not answer this question.

Census data show Maines population is aging and decreasing, with some economists suggesting that immigration is the best way to reverse those trends. What should the state do to address this demographic trend?

As note in 14, above, Maine must be more business friendly, and provide the education and vocational training necessary to ensure a skilled workforce and ensure jobs for those graduating from high school who choose not to go to college. While Maine has a low unemployment rate, part of that low rate is because a number of people have dropped out of the job market. A recent report noted that Maine ranks 45th (of the 50 states) in work participation rates, at 19.1 percent. Part of the solution is job training for those able-bodied individuals who are currently on the state's welfare program and assistance with placement in well-paying jobs.

What is the most pressing issue in Maine these questions have not addressed?

Candidate did not answer this question.