Race for Maine House District 10

in the 2014 General Election

Amy J. Davidoff

Amy J. Davidoff

1,734 (40.4%)

Democratic - Arundel

Candidate profile


Total raised: $5,710
Types of contributions
Monetary donations: $420
Maine Clean Elections money: $5,210
Candidate self-financing: $80
Loans: $0
In-kind donations: $0
Davidoff raised 39.21% of the amount Parry raised.
Donations from inside Maine vs. out-of-state
Donations from inside Maine (excludes self-financing): $320
Donations from outside Maine: $100
Maine Clean Elections money: $5,210
Candidate self-financing: $80
Davidoff raised 39.21% of the amount Parry raised.
Correction: An earlier version of this graph incorrectly noted Maine Clean Elections money as from out-of-state.
Wayne R. Parry

Wayne R. Parry

2,558 (59.6%)

Republican - Arundel

Candidate profile


Total raised: $14,564
Types of contributions
Monetary donations: $14,017
Maine Clean Elections money: $0
Candidate self-financing: $545
Loans: $0
In-kind donations: $0
Donations from inside Maine vs. out-of-state
Donations from inside Maine (excludes self-financing): $13,443
Donations from outside Maine: $575
Maine Clean Elections money: $0
Candidate self-financing: $545

Is Maine too generous in providing social services to its residents? Which government benefits should be increased or decreased?

Davidoff
No The goals and effectiveness of social services must be clearly defined with measurable outcomes. I feel strongly that as members of a mature society, we need to help each other through hard times. However, the goals and effectiveness of public assistance programs should be clearly defined with measurable outcomes. Ideally, we should have services that help people/families address acute problems, and have services to allow them to regain their independence. One important component that needs to be addressed is that eligibility for assistance should not be cut off abruptly when income rises above a set point. For example, if a person takes on a job, they should not immediately lose their benefits, but rather have the benefits decline gradually over time. This would enable families to have some stability and move ahead, rather than perpetually trying to dig out of a hole. We should have programs that are supportive not punitive. Punitive measures alone only send people underground and put children and other society members at risk, and they do not get us to the goal of having people become productive members of our society. We need a comprehensive strategy with our social services that are designed to help people break the cycle of dependence, and help them succeed to their full potential. There will always be some members of our society who need assistance and are not going to be able to exist independently. We should be compassionate enough to help them (and their families) have safe and enriching live.

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Parry
Yes Benefit should be increased to the truly needed and if someone receives benefits and starts working they should be tiered off, not loose all

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Do you support lowering the state income tax? If so, what state spending would you cut to make up for the loss of revenue?

Davidoff
No Long-term goals must be defined before determining whether (and which) taxes can be cut. We need to take a comprehensive look at state revenue, and have clear objectives as to what is important to us as a society, before unilaterally lowering income taxes). Changing the tax burden should be measured by the goals to be achieved. For example, people on a fixed income should not loose their homes because of rising property taxes. Small businesses should not be paying higher taxes than large corporations. If our goals include having a robust public school system, effective and safe infrastructure, and healthy environment (all of which will help us attract new businesses and industries), then we need to determine how to fund these goals without jeopardizing the seniors, middles class families and small businesses. I firmly believe in setting out measurable goals, and assessing the effectiveness of programs. Therefore, I can not commit at this time as to whether or how much income taxes should be cut.

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Parry
Yes Since cutting taxes does not mean a loss in revenue, when we cut taxes in the 125th legislature, income tax revenue increased

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Should labor unions be allowed to require workers to pay dues as a condition of employment, regardless of whether the worker joins the union?

Davidoff
Yes Collective bargaining for wages, benefits, and work place safety, is an important right for workers. Collective bargaining for wages, benefits, and work place safety, is an important right for workers. Fair and equitable wages/benefits and safe employment are essential, and workers should have the right to negotiate for these.

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Parry
No No one should be forced to pay to get a job.

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Would you vote to expand Medicaid eligibility as allowed by the Affordable Care Act?

Davidoff
Yes Everyone should be covered, because it is economically prudent, since preventive medicine is far less expensive than emergency care. It costs us all a lot more money when people do not have health care coverage. Primary care is much more cost effective than emergent and/or unreimbursed care. Preventing chronic diseases is a lot less expensive than treating chronic diseases. When the hospitals/clinics are not compensated for their services, the all of us who do contribute to our health care costs, pay for those who are not covered. By not expanding access to affordable health insurance, we are losing significant funds from the Federal government for supporting the expansion of Medicaid, AND it will ultimately cost the state significantly because we are not preventing/treating chronic diseases. It simply makes economic (and moral) sense to expand Medicaid.

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Parry
No The Maine taxpayers cannot afford it.We already expanded and that's why we owed the hospitals $750million

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What is the biggest thing Maine can do to attract more jobs to the state?

Davidoff
Invest in long-term sustainable initiatives. Promote programs that are focused on long term goals with sustainability at the core of those goals. We need to invest in education at all levels, from early childhood education, K-12 and colleges/universities and workforce training programs. These investments will enable the growth of traditional and new technologies (e.g., manufacturing alternative energy devices, research and development), and to handle a growing need for health care workers and support staff (e.g., enhance access to home health care, and allow seniors to live at home safely and with dignity). We need to treat our environment as the precious resource that it is, which will attract and sustain businesses (particularly small business) for generations to come (e.g., fishing, farming, agriculture, ecotourism). These investments and goals will help our economy now and in the future.

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Parry
Lower our income tax. People that own businesses are not going to high tax states

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Should Maine legalize, tax and regulate recreational marijuana? If so, where should the revenues go?

Davidoff
Yes It has been shown to be less harmful than cigarette or alcohol consumption, and there are multiple therapeutic effects. We should legalize, tax and regulate the sale of marijuana, and establish programs to educate the public about how to use it responsibly and any risks in using it (as we have done with tobacco settlement money for education and promoting smoking). There should be an age restriction on its use/purchase as with alcohol. As a society, we can legalize a substance but not condone its use publicly. We would not only generate revenue from the legal sale of marijuana but we would save significantly on interdiction and prison costs.

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Should the governor be allowed to delay the sale of general obligation bonds that have been approved by voters?

Davidoff
No It is wrong for the governor to delay the sale of approved bonds based on ideology, especially when it is not related to the bond. The governor should not be allowed to delay the sale of bond that have already been approved by the voters, particularly when there are no data supporting the decision, and only based on ideology. We need to invest in our infrastructure, which will help in creating more jobs and ultimately be less expensive in the long run.

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Parry
Yes If by issuing bonds our credit rating goes down so it will cost us more then first thought, than Yes.

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What should the state do to lower energy costs? What commitment should Maine make to renewable technology?

Davidoff
Conservation, invest in renewable energy technology. Conservation is the best way to lower energy costs. We need to invest in home/business weatherizing and in renewable technologies. These investments will save money, help our environment, and create new jobs. Promoting manufacturing of alternative energy technologies will help preserve our environment and help our economy. Our state has a significant number of manufacturing buildings/infrastructure that could be renovated and retrofitted to accommodate emerging technologies. We could lead the country in new manufacturing practices and put our people back to work.

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Parry
We need more Natural Gas and the best renewable of all is hydropower, we need to do more of that.

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Should lawmakers make it a priority — even if it means raising taxes — to fulfill the voters' mandate to have the state fund 55 percent of the total cost of K-12 public education?

Davidoff
Yes Investing in educational programs, teachers and other resources are the keys to our economic future. Investing in educational programs, teachers and other resources are the keys to our economic future. With the disparity of the property values and tax bases among towns in our state, there must be more sensible and equitable ways to finance our public education, then to rely so heavily on property taxes (especially in the less wealthy communities). We need to have outstanding school systems throughout the entire state. This is what will make and keep our economy strong.

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Parry
No All the democrats will say yes to this question, but with a democrat gov. and legislature they funded less than Gov LePage

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Should Maine have more charter schools?

Davidoff
No It depends on the funding model and the community needs. It depends on the funding model and the community needs. There are examples of public charter schools that fill a niche for programs that are beyond the capacity of existing school systems. However, I am not comfortable with the idea of public funds being siphoned off for private charter schools.

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Parry
Yes If the ones under current law work, lets see how the 10 that are allow now work.

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